The Adventure Game and Interactive Novel

The Adventure Game and Interactive Novel


The scavenger’s daughter

 

When horror becomes history, people end up to underestimate it. It’s a sort of an emotional detachment, like it was only something that is written in a book. People tend to forget that some things really happened. Maybe it’s just a mental mechanism to survive the horror, to avoid imagining: “what if it had happened to me?”.

 

The story of our game takes place in the Southern France of the XIV century, but it was between 1500 and 1600 that the Inquisition reached the apex of its cruelty and agency. It was in that time that many of the most terrible torture machines and practices were invented. But it was not all blood, slashing and gore, no. The worst tortures were often the simplest and most bearable ones. Apparently bearable.

 

I wanna ask you to make an experiment. Lay on your bed and cuddle up, then stay still. Stay completely still, without moving a muscle.

 

How long did you manage not to move? Five seconds? Ten? Then you get tired. You feel the natural need to move, to change position, to stretch.

 

Now imagine you have to repeat the experiment once again. But it’s not an experiment this time. You are not making it by your own free will, you can’t quit, and you’re not laying on your bed. Instead you are locked up in a dark and stinky cell, drenches in your own faeces, you have been enchained for two days with no food nor water, bind by the scavenger’s daughter.

 

The scavenger's daughter

 

A person condemned to this punishment would perhaps sigh with relief seeing that he is not destined to blades, whips and pliers. But right after a few minutes he would feel cramps in all his body. Natural acts like stretching a leg of scratching would become obsessive desires. And desperately trying to fulfil them he could only skin and slash his own flesh were it is bind. Within a couple of hours his descent to madness would begin…

 

And nothing could prevent the torturers to integrate this punishment with beating, whipping and other torments, to undergo without being able to move a muscle, to let out an involuntary shake, an instinctive physical response to pain.

 

There are fates far worse than death…

 



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